2008

  • December 22, 2008 | NPR

     

    Morning Edition, December 22, 2008 · Mr. President-elect, you rarely spoke out as a candidate against the "don't ask, don't tell" policy that excludes openly gay people from the military. But when the group Human Rights Campaign asked you about it a year...

  • December 2, 2008 | U.S. News and World Report

    When it comes to President-elect Barack Obama making good on his campaign promise to repeal "don't ask, don't tell," gays and lesbians—70 percent of whom voted for him—may have to be patient. Advocates of the repeal are warning that any action might take a year or more.

    Given the host of issues on Obama's plate, they say...

  • November 25, 2008 | The New Repulic

    Last month, retired Air Force General Merrill McPeak, one of Barack Obama's highest-ranking military supporters during the campaign, reiterated his opposition to openly gay service. When McPeak participated in the debates over lifting the ban in 1993, he was Secretary of the Air Force. Like most military members who shared his position then,...

  • November 18, 2008 | New York Times
    To the Editor:

    Re ''Newest Veterans Hit Hard by Economic Crisis'' (front page, Nov. 18):

    One group of veterans who face added but avoidable economic distress are the thousands of gay men and lesbians who serve their country but cannot avail themselves of military benefits for their families.

    Because of ''don'...
  • November 18, 2008 | CNN Online
    WASHINGTON (CNN) -- The U.S. military's "don't ask-don't tell" policy could be overturned in the first year of President-elect Barack Obama's administration, according to the lead sponsor of a bill that would repeal the law.

    A bill that would repeal the U.S. military's "don't ask-don't tell" policy has 149 co-...
  • November 18, 2008 | Boston Online
    It's the issue that got Bill Clinton's presidency off on something of the wrong foot -- gays in the military.

    And now, more than 100 retired generals and admirals are urging President-elect Barack Obama to tackle it early as well.

    Over the objections of many in the military, Clinton lifted the ban on homosexuals and...
  • November 17, 2008 | CNN Online
    WASHINGTON (CNN) -- More than 100 retired U.S. military leaders -- including the former head of the Naval Academy -- have signed a statement calling for an end to the military's "don't ask-don't tell" policy, according to a California-based think tank that supports the movement.
    The "don't ask-don't tell" policy should go...
  • November 17, 2008 | Associated Press

    More than 100 retired generals and admirals called Monday for repeal of the military's "don't ask, don't tell" policy on gays so they can serve openly, according to a statement obtained by The Associated Press.

    The move by the military veterans...

  • November 1, 2008 | Ambiente Online

    I was not the only one of my friends who fought back tears when I watched Colin Powell describe why he was endorsing Barack Obama for president.  Here was a man who was born in Harlem to Jamaican immigrants, grew up in the Bronx, and knew a thing or two...

  • October 4, 2008 | National Journal

    The contrast is stark. McCain holds socially conservative positions on gay issues, and Obama favors an expansion of gay and lesbian rights. Obama calls for the repeal of the military's "don't ask, don't tell" policy and believes that homosexuals should be allowed to serve openly.

    President Clinton's attempt to change...