Recruiting

"We're here to defend democracy, not to practice it."

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 (This post submitted by Christian Leuprecht) Implicit in this claim is the proposition is an allegedly inherent contradiction: That mounting an effective defence of the democratic way of life and its fundamental values of freedom, equality, and justice requires undemocratic practices that skirt these values.

Performance Brings Attention to Sexual Violence in the U.S. Military

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Pat Payne's performance, “Crawl,” directly addresses recent GAO and Veteran Affairs data on rape and sexual assault in the military, but it also speaks to "don't ask, don't tell."

DADT & ROTC

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Only four Ivy League schools allow ROTC on campus. The "don't ask, don't tell" policy is given as one reason for barring ROTC from college campuses. Obama and McCain have called on universities to rethink their position.

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Balancing Your Strengths Against Your Felonies

Considerations for Military Recruitment of Ex-Offenders
September 1, 2007
Michael Boucai
University of Miami Law Review

This article deals with ex-offender employment in the U.S. Armed Forces, one context in which the necessity of balancing strengths against felonies is taken very seriously.

Click here to download the article.

A full list of the waivers listed, by offense and by service is here.

This article deals with
ex-offender employment in the U.S. Armed Forces, one context in which
the necessity of balancing strengths against felonies is taken very
seriously.  read more »

Opinions of Military Personnel on Sexual Minorities in the Military

December 1, 2006
John Zogby, John Bruce, Rebecca Wittman, Sam Rodgers
Zogby International

This survey of current and
recent military service personnel who have served in
Iraq or Afghanistan (or in combat support roles directly
supporting those operations) sought to explore the issue
of sexual minorities in the United States military,
specifically within the context of three key areas.  read more »

U.S Military Policies Concerning Homosexuals

Development, Implementation and Outcomes
November 1, 2001
Rhonda Evans
Palm Center White Paper

Throughout the U.S. military’s history, its treatment of sexual minorities has varied both as medical and popular understandings about homosexuality have shifted and as the needs of the armed forces themselves have changed. Military regulations have moved increasingly away from criminal prosecution to the discharge of homosexual service members in response to changing views among medical professionals about the root causes of homosexuality. The U.S. armed forces presently maintain a complete ban on the service of sexual minorities, regardless of conduct or performance.  read more »

A History of the Service of Ethnic Minorites in the U.S. Armed Forces

June 1, 2003
Rhonda Evans

U.S. military has repeatedly been forced to
attenuate the divisions, antagonisms and distrust that have troubled American
culture more broadly. This necessity
has stemmed from the unique position of the armed forces as both a defensive
and a “total” institution in American civic life.  read more »

U.S. Military Integration of Religious, Ethnic, and Racial Minorities in the Twentieth Century

May 1, 2001
Margot Canaday
Palm Center White Paper

Throughout the twentieth century, the American military has brought together cultural, religious, and racial groups even when civilian life has been characterized by considerable prejudice towards such groups. Indeed, military integration has often proceeded at a faster pace than civilian integration. This publication describes five examples of this.  read more »

Financial Analysis of Don't Ask, Don't Tell: How Much Does the Gay Ban Cost?

February 1, 2006
Blue Ribbon Commission
Palm Center Whitepaper

Financial Analysis of Don't Ask, Don't Tell: How Much Does the Gay Ban Cost?: Authored by a Blue Ribbon Commission, February 2006. Please click here to see the data on which the report is based. Click here for media coverage of the story. Click here for GAO's critique of the Blue Ribbon report, and click here for our analysis of that critique.

In February 2005, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) released a report on the costs of discharging and replacing service members fired for homosexuality during the first ten years of the "don't ask, don't tell" policy.  This report addresses oversights in the methodology of that report leading to an estimated cost of $363.8 million, of 91 percent more than originally reported.

In February 2005, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) released a report on the costs of discharging and replacing service members fired for homosexuality during the first ten years of the "don't ask, don't tell" policy.  This report addresses oversights in the methodology of that report leading to an estimated cost of $363.8 million, of 91 percent more than originally reported.  read more »

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