"The Importance of Objective Analysis" on Gays in the Military

A Response to Elaine Donnelly's 'Constructing the Co-Ed Military'
November 10, 2008
Jeanne Scheper, Nathaniel Frank, Aaron Belkin, Gary J. Gates
Duke Journal of Gender Law & Policy, Volume 15:419, 2008

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On February 28, 2007, former Rep. Martin Meehan (D-MA) and a bipartisan group of co-sponsors reintroduced the Military Readiness Enhancement Act in the House of Representatives to amend title 10 United States Code § 654 (“Policy Concerning Homosexuality in the Armed Forces”) to enhance the readiness of the Armed Forces by replacing the current “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy with a policy of nondiscrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. In the recent DUKE JOURNAL OF GENDER LAW AND POLICY article, “Constructing the Co-Ed Military,” Elaine Donnelly, president of the Center for Military Readiness, asserts that “nothing has changed that would justify the turmoil that would occur in and outside of Congress if Meehan’s legislation were seriously considered or passed.”2 But on what evidence is she basing her claims that turmoil would ensue if 10 U.S.C § 654, the ban on openly gay service members, were repealed?...

 

Click here to download the full article.


On February 28, 2007, former Rep. Martin Meehan (D-MA) and a bipartisan group of co-sponsors reintroduced the Military Readiness Enhancement Act in the House of Representatives to amend title 10 United States Code § 654 (“Policy Concerning Homosexuality in the Armed Forces”) to enhance the readiness of the Armed Forces by replacing the current “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy with a policy of nondiscrimination on the basis of sexual orientation.

In the recent DUKE JOURNAL OF GENDER LAW AND POLICY article, “Constructing the Co-Ed Military,” Elaine Donnelly, president of the Center for Military Readiness, asserts that “nothing has changed that would justify the turmoil that would occur in and outside of Congress if Meehan’s legislation were seriously considered or passed.”2 But on what evidence is she basing her claims that turmoil would ensue if 10 U.S.C § 654, the ban on openly gay service members, were repealed?...